Be an Egg Donor

The UC Center for Reproductive Health collaborates with intended parents to offer solutions to infertility. Many couples who want to have children find it difficult or impossible to conceive. That is why we offer our intended parents the option of known or anonymous egg donation. Known egg donation is reserved for those individuals or couples who select a family member or friend to be their egg donor. Anonymous egg donation is when the donor is unknown to the intended couple. Most intended parents use anonymous egg donation.

Our donor selection is diverse and all egg donors have been thoroughly screened and educated on the process of egg donation. We follow the guidelines of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) as well as FDA regulations for egg donation and egg donor compensation. We select only those women as donors who truly want to help others have a child and have passed appropriate physical, genetic and psychological screening.

What is egg donation?
Who is eligible to be an egg donor?
Who will receive my eggs?
How do I become an egg donor?
Do I have any financial obligations?
What are the potential risks of egg donation?
What should I expect as an egg donor?

What is egg donation?

Egg donation is the voluntary act of one woman giving another woman her eggs in the hopes of helping that woman become a mother by way of in vitro fertilization. Egg donors are monetarily compensated for their time and generosity.

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Who is eligible to be an egg donor?

Any woman in good health between the ages of 20 and 32 is a potential candidate. However, we do not bank and freeze donor eggs for “stock.” Each of our egg donors is called upon to donate when there is a direct recipient in need.

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Who will receive my eggs?

Your eggs will be used to help women who are unable to have children because:

  • They have no ovaries.
  • Their ovaries are no longer functioning.
  • They are carriers of serious genetic diseases that can be passed on to their children if they become pregnant by natural means.

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How do I become an egg donor?

Step 1: Contact The UC Center for Reproductive Health at (513) 585-4012 to express interest, discuss the process of donating and completion of your online profile. Important topics that will be discussed during your conversation include:

  • Anonymity and confidentiality: Your identity will never be revealed to the recipient couple as this process is completely anonymous.
  • Providing a detailed profile of your family history including medical and genetic history and recent photographs of yourself. Photographs help us match your physical characteristics to those of a recipient.
  • Time commitment: Four to six early-morning office visits including blood work and pelvic ultrasounds.
  • Injectable medications for two to four weeks.

Step 2: After full consideration, you will then be asked to create an online profile. Upon completion, the UC Center for Reproductive Health will contact you to schedule a 30- to 60-minute in-person interview to:

  • Review your profile.
  • Discuss the egg donation process further including its associated risks.
  • Answer any questions you may have.

Step 3: If you decide to proceed, you will be scheduled for:

  • A physical examination including a pelvic ultrasound.
  • Blood work to assess the health of your ovaries.
  • Psychological evaluation to discuss the complex emotional, moral, ethical and psychosocial aspects of being an egg donor.

Step 4: When an appropriate match with a potential recipient is found, we will contact you to set up the next set of screening tests and teach you how to self-administer the injectable medications that will prepare your eggs for donation. Some donors may be asked to participate immediately, while others may not be asked to participate for months. Unfortunately, not every woman who volunteers to go through the screening process is matched with a recipient.

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Do I have any financial obligations?

As an egg donor candidate through the UC Center for Reproductive Health, you are not expected to pay for screening tests (medical and psychological), medications or procedures involved with the egg donation process. Each egg donor will receive financial compensation for her time and generosity upon completion of her donation cycle.

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What are the potential risks of egg donation?

Being an egg donor has no long-term health risks and there are no adverse effects on your future fertility.

A small percentage (less than 10 percent) of women who use fertility injections develop temporary side effects including headaches, bloating and mood swings. These disappear with discontinuation of the medication.

The egg harvesting-retrieval procedure is associated with extremely remote risks. Most patients lose less than a tablespoon of blood. The needle used to collect the eggs is guided by ultrasound so as not to damage pelvic organs. Egg harvesting is a sterile procedure, accompanied by antibiotics, so developing an infection is highly unlikely.

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What should I expect as an egg donor?

The UC Center for Reproductive Health strives to listen, guide and support each egg donor through the entire process of egg donation. Each donor will receive personalized attention ensuring flexibility, integrity, trust and ultimately satisfaction.

If you have any questions please contact the UC Center for Reproductive Health at (513) 585-4012.

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