University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute | UCCI

Contact and Appointments: (513) 475-8500

Cancers We Treat

Our Genitourinary Cancer Center offers specialized care for all stages of urologic cancer, including:

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, but it can be successfully managed when detected in its early stages. Assessing the stage (extent) of the cancer is critical to an effective treatment plan. Early prostate cancer generally has no symptoms and is discovered through a screening consisting of digital rectal exam and a blood test (PSA). When the results of the screening suggest prostate cancer, we take additional steps to determine if prostate tumors are present and if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Additional information is available from the following organizations:

Learn about our Genitourinary Cancer Center’s Treatment & Services for Prostate Cancer

Kidney Cancer

One of the 10 most common cancers, kidney cancer affects more men than women. Kidney cancers are often found when the patient undergoes an imaging study (CT scan, MRI, etc.) for symptoms unrelated to kidney disease. In its earliest stages, kidney cancer does not cause any symptoms.

Symptoms that are found in later stages may include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Lower back pain
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss or persistent fever
  • Swelling of the legs and ankles

These symptoms are not specific to kidney cancer, so if you have them see your physician.

Additional information is available from the following organizations:

We are the only regional center offering a multidisciplinary non-invasive approach to the cryo (freezing) ablation of kidney tumors using computed tomography (CT)-guided kidney biopsy and destruction of the tumor in selected cases. Learn about Treatment & Services for Kidney Cancer.

Bladder Cancer

If diagnosed early, bladder cancer can often be treated successfully. The average age of diagnosis for bladder cancer is 66, with males being diagnosed two times more frequently than females. The most common sign of bladder cancer is blood in the urine, but a small number of patients also experience urinary urgency, frequency or pain. Although blood in the urine does not necessarily indicate bladder cancer, see your urologist immediately to determine the underlying cause.

Additional information is available from the following organizations:

Learn about our Genitourinary Cancer Center’s Treatment & Services for Bladder Cancer.

Testicular Cancer

Although it is rare, testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men aged 15 to 35. Fortunately, it is highly responsive to treatments. The earlier the cancer is detected and treated, the better the outcome. Approximately 97 percent of all testicular cancers are cured by surgery alone or with the addition of radiation treatment or chemotherapy.

Symptoms of testicular cancer may include:

  • A lump or enlargement in either testicle
  • A feeling of heaviness or swelling in the scrotum
  • A dull ache or pain in the abdomen, groin or back
  • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum
  • Pain in a testicle or the scrotum
  • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts

Many conditions other than cancer can also cause these symptoms, so see your physician for an evaluation.

Additional information is available from the following organizations:

Learn about our Genitourinary Cancer Center’s Treatment & Services for Testicular Cancer

Adrenal Cancer

The adrenals are small glands above each kidney. These endocrine glands secrete hormones that regulate several important functions throughout the body including kidney function, blood pressure and metabolism.

Most adrenal tumors are benign (not cancerous). Some benign tumors actively secrete hormones in excess causing imbalance of the endocrine system that may lead to high blood pressure, narrowing of blood vessels, fatigue and weight gain. Non-functioning adrenal tumors (ones that do not produce hormones) typically have no symptoms and are discovered during imaging studies performed for other conditions. Adrenal cancers are rare, but cancers originating in other organs may spread to the adrenal glands.

Additional information is available from the following organizations:

Learn about our Genitourinary Cancer Center’s Treatment & Services for Adrenal Cancer